Author Archives: Mrs. Emery

The Proof by Gabrielle H

The proof is in the pudding
This I hold dear
That I know when I am sleeping
That the end is near
I’m not a nut
It’s a feeling in the gut
That when I wake
That it’s far past tomorrow
For goodness sake!
Is there time for me to borrow?
Will I see my brother
When he finds another
And decides to make them more important than family
By and by I start to cry
Since I know very soon he’ll leave me

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NAPOWRIMO Day #20

Today’s prompt:

Write a humor poem where your speaker is having an epiphany. What epiphany is that?

Reminders
Please read the NaPoWriMo page for details on how the challenge works and how you can participate this month, no matter what your personal writing challenge is for the month of April. Please read How to Post During NaPoWriMo. Remember that work shared this month is shared in precisely that spirit: sharing, as opposed to critiquing.

Birds of a Feather Flock Together by Eshanie WH

“Donny…are you okay?” Anya’s concerned gaze burned through Donny’s back. He scoffs and turns to look at his older sister. “Of course, I’m okay, Anya. How can you even ask that? Our sister just left us, just like Dad!” His dark brown eyes glare harshly at Anya, who flinches, her bright, brown eyes moving to the floor. “And who gave her the right to take our baby brother like that anyway?!” He continued. “She promised us she would protect us! I can’t believe she left us to deal with Mom.” Anya sighs and makes her way towards her hurt brother. She wraps her arms around him tight, whispering in his ear. “I know you’re hurt. But I’m hurt too. You know Adam and Anastelle will be too.” Donny starts sobbing as he squeezes his sister. “But we need to be strong for them, okay? especially for Anastelle. She was closest to her.”
Anya lets go to wipe Donny’s tears away. “The only thing we can do is move forward. As your older sister, I have to make sure you guys are alright.” Donny smiles wistfully then moves out of his room. As he walks down the hall, he hears faint footsteps. He looks back to see his adorable five-year-old sister, Anastelle, running towards him. “Hey, there sweetie!” Donny grins and bends down to pick her up. She giggles and brushes her lengthy russet hair out of her face. “Donny, Where isth Annie? I didn’ see her yesterday!” Anastelle pouts and throws her stubby arms around her favorite brother (she would never say that in front of Adam though). Donny sighs and looks away. “Annabelle…left for a little while, ‘Stelle.” Donny makes his way downstairs. “Wher did she go? Th’ Stwor?” Donny ignores her and notices Adam in his usual spot, the music room, to the far left of the living room. Adam, Annabelle, and Anastelle loved music. Donny knocks on the open door twice, startling his younger brother, “We need to talk, Adam.” He sees Anya creep up behind him. “It’s very important we do so. Mother won’t be back for a few days, but we need to talk about this. Now.” Adam’s bright blue eyes widened, and he makes his way into the living room, Donny and Anya in tow. Anastelle sits on Donny’s hip, lips pursed in confusion. Anya sighs and looks at her uneasy siblings. “There’s no easy way to say this, so I’ll make it quick.” Anya closes her eyes. “Annabelle left early this morning with Austin. I don’t where she went, but I know she’s not coming back.” She pulls out a piece of paper from her pants pocket. “She…left this note.”
Slightly frowning, Anya begins reading. “My dear siblings, I know that as your oldest sister, it is my duty and obligation to protect you. Ever since Father left, Mother has been an emotional wreck, to say the least. I tried to protect you in the best way possible, but no one will get anywhere just by avoiding Mother’s wrath. I know it wasn’t enough and I’m sorry. Please forgive me. I am leaving Sunday at dawn with Austin. If I had the choice, I would bring every single one of you with me. Please take care of each other.” Adam and Donny start tearing up. “I can’t tell you where I’m going, or if I’m coming back. Just know that I love you, I always have and always will.” Anya scowls and snarls out the end of the letter. “She…really left us.” Adam sinks into the couch next to Donny. Anastelle, not understanding the situation, falls asleep on Donny. Anya fights back her tears and sits between her brothers. They simultaneously threw their arms around her, Anastelle tiredly got up to sleep in another chair. The three siblings tightly embrace each other, quietly sobbing. Why does it have to be this way? Anya somberly ponders, tears rushing down her face.

NAPOWRIMO Day #19

Today’s prompt:

Try writing a poem incorperating a word from the title of the last book you finished or are reading.

Reminders
Please read the NaPoWriMo page for details on how the challenge works and how you can participate this month, no matter what your personal writing challenge is for the month of April. Please read How to Post During NaPoWriMo. Remember that work shared this month is shared in precisely that spirit: sharing, as opposed to critiquing.

Poetry: Write What You Feel by Grace

Poetry, to me, is the voice of our feelings. There are so many forms, so much flexibility in the rules of poetry, and way-more-than-I-can-count metaphors and similes and devices you can manipulate and create to capture the uniqueness of your emotion and tone, thus allowing us to paint exactly how we feel in the way that we want to. We all share the same emotions—sadness, anger, distress, joy, and excitement. But I believe that those emotions can be depicted and are perceived differently by each individual, and that is what makes those unique metaphors and images refreshing and impactful to readers. That uniqueness comes from you writing what you feel. And that, to me, is how you write poetry.

The basis of writing a poem is to identify those feelings you are trying to convey, and the meat of poetry writing is crafting how you convey those feelings. An answer I found online is this: “The short answer is that poetry connects the conscious with the subconscious mind to produce a catharsis. It’s no more than this.” While there are several methods to writing poetry, and you can manipulate sounds and rhythm to produce intended effects, poetry is ultimately releasing what you are feeling or thinking. I know it sounds simpler than what poetry writing process can be—with complex undertones and abstract illustration, sometimes it’s hard to figure out exactly how we want to convey our feelings. However, the most important thing is to allow your poems to flow from you naturally with a goal of what effects you want to produce to express your message at the forefront of your thought process. Don’t force anything you feel hinders your message or conveyance of emotion/feeling. Force loses the readers, force prevents the readers from connecting with what you are saying.

When you go to write a poem, think about the feeling and emotions you have been experiencing. Think of what emotions you want to convey—anger, resentment, happiness, gratitude, or joy? Now think of how you perceive those emotions or think of how you want to depict them. Imagine what action or image best represents or symbolizes how you feel. For example, in the poem “Never Again” that I wrote as a reaction to the Parkland shooting, I thought long and hard about how I was feeling. For the most part, I was speechless and shocked. I felt like “words were stripped from my skin,” and so I used that line to convey how shocked and speechless I was. I opened with that line and just began to release everything I had been pondering over and allowing it to take shape in the way I was imagining it, sort of to express the stages of my reaction, from shocked to realizing how real this issue was becoming. I realized letting my thoughts flow in a free style was the best way to express my feelings as I began to shape my poem. It’s sort of hard to explain, but if you are able to identify and imagine the feelings you are experiencing, images and representation of what you are thinking start to take shape by using what you know and what you’ve seen or felt.

I know writing poetry might seem daunting, its concept might seem elusive. But the core of writing poetry is to write what you feel. I say that you should write naturally, but it really takes practice to master how you want to effectively convey your feelings. Think logically and realistically about the portrayal of your feelings—what most accurately reflects them? What will readers be able to connect with or understand? What do you want them to strive to understand from the way you have portrayed your emotions? Read published poems to practice identifying the emotions being conveyed so you can apply outside methods to your own poetry.

Don’t force your poetry! Think and reflect, imagine and most importantly feel. That, to me, is how poetry is meant to be created.

Happy writing!

NAPOWRMO Day #18

Today’s prompt:

Write a poem about your favorite season.

Reminders
Please read the NaPoWriMo page for details on how the challenge works and how you can participate this month, no matter what your personal writing challenge is for the month of April. Please read How to Post During NaPoWriMo. Remember that work shared this month is shared in precisely that spirit: sharing, as opposed to critiquing.

Fallen Angel by Marysa S

The angel with the broken wings
Doesn’t fly, they lie in slings
The light from her halo extinguished
Powers are slowly being relinquished
She sympathizes for the vessel possessed
She took away everything from them
Only to have her fate condemned
She wanders around in the dark
Knowing she never fulfilled her part
Heaven now finds her redundant
Leaving her feeling despondent
Ready to quit, she looks to the sky
And shouts the only thought in her head-“why?”
But whomever above, won’t answer this time
She’s left alone with the pain that she feels
As she realizes that heaven’s not real

NAPOWRIMO Day #17

Today’s prompt:

Write a poem about or from the perspective of the object nearest you.

Reminders
Please read the NaPoWriMo page for details on how the challenge works and how you can participate this month, no matter what your personal writing challenge is for the month of April. Please read How to Post During NaPoWriMo. Remember that work shared this month is shared in precisely that spirit: sharing, as opposed to critiquing.

What Happened by Sofia C

My life isn’t perfect,
It isn’t full of glee.
My life is a disaster,
I couldn’t think of why.
My mother, father, brother,
We can’t seem to imply.
Where’s the merry smile I
Used to have?
Where’s that person that held
Me from danger?
Now I have none. It is pointless to ask.
But I have courage to say:
What happened?
What happened to my family?
What happened to our bonds?
What happened to fun times being along?
I’m in my own realm, I can’t seem to escape.
The knots holding me back don’t seem to shake.
I can’t leave, I can’t go. Whenever I cry for help,
Their reactions make me cold.
Nothing I do seems to work, nothing at all.
I hope one day my family and I will fix our
Problems and get along.
That day seems so far, so far and so away.
I don’t really think I can bear another day.

NAPOWRIMO Day #16

Today’s prompt:

Create a poem with a few book titles you find on your shelf.

Reminders
Please read the NaPoWriMo page for details on how the challenge works and how you can participate this month, no matter what your personal writing challenge is for the month of April. Please read How to Post During NaPoWriMo. Remember that work shared this month is shared in precisely that spirit: sharing, as opposed to critiquing.