Category Archives: Student Writing

“End of Year Message” by Mary-Kelly

Young one set down your pen
Don’t hesitate, this is not the end
Your hard work has paid off and you’ve done well
You’ve blossomed and escaped your shell,
Whether you leave for good or stick another year
We are more than happy to have you here
From novels to short stories and poetry galore
Please continue to write more and more,
I hope and pray that your ink flows
To places where no one goes
A heart like yours is born to write
To color in the black and white,
I bid goodbye our senior friends
As you leave you walk with brand-new lens
I wish you luck with words from the heart
Let your ink mark your brand new start.

The End of a Chapter by Grace

It’s hard to believe the end of the school year is already here. Honestly, it felt like all the months morphed together to form one single day—I can hardly think of when I felt time was moving slow. With an entire year at our backs, the future in our sights, and the present a single heartbeat, it might feel overwhelming. I look back at this year and felt I didn’t really progress as I had wanted to. I gave up easily, I didn’t take on many new challenges, I didn’t balance my school and my writing life at all, really. I kept saying, “I’ll work on it tomorrow,” “I’ll try that tomorrow,” “I’ll begin this piece on the weekend.” But when tomorrow came, I was still struggling to make up for what I hadn’t accomplished the day before. There are still many things I am proud of, and still more challenges and experiences to come, but I do think it’s important to abolish that timeless excuse of: “I’ll do it tomorrow.” Because tomorrow may have a new challenge you didn’t anticipate, and you’ll end up never getting to do what you wanted to.

I have one year of high school left, and there’s still so much I want and need to do. If ten months felt like a blink of an eye this year, how much faster will it go next year? Probably twice as fast. Sometimes it troubles me when I feel like I have nothing to show for my growth as a writer—I certainly have felt like I’ve learned a lot this year. I learned to not hold myself to somebody else’s standard, but to strive to succeed on my own terms as a writer. I learned it’s okay to take a break if things become overwhelming—you can’t force good writing (sure, you have to force it sometimes, but the best writing comes when it wants to!). And, of course, I learned (as I do every year), that wasting your time only hinders your success. Productivity is the key, and boy do I struggle with it.

Don’t despair if you didn’t accomplish what you wanted to, if you ended up in that state of laziness that you couldn’t get out of. You have today to get working on it. Set aside some time today to get cracking. Spend time today drawing inspiration, immersing yourself, building yourself back up to the writer you were meant to be. Don’t tell yourself “I’ll do it tomorrow.” Because I have found that tomorrow became today, and like dominos, each day was knocked down without a single word written. I know it might be an overused, clichéd message. But having experienced it myself, it really is important to understand. When you work on it today, you have tomorrow to make it better.

And it’s better to have something to work off of than to have nothing at all.

I hope everyone’s summer is safe and wonderful! May it be filled with countless days of writing. I am just itching to begin!

‘Reflections in the Wake of a Life’ by Alexia

The silver ashes of a gray wolf,
No longer is she lying broken,
But to be spread across creation,
Carried in the hands of the mighty winds,
Twilight glinting off her dead splints,
The flames reflected in the wake of her life,
Reflected onto an ocean free from strife,
Dancing ‘cross the placid planes,
Of her magnificent life, only reflections remain.

Just How Important Is Writing? by Natalie

As my high school years come to a close (as do my FLVS and CWC ones), I’ve taken a long hard look at the things I’ve accomplished and learned along the way. While thinking about the CWC and how much it has been a part of me, I came to realize the real importance of writing. Although creative writing is fun and an art all by itself, I reflected on how critical writing is as a skill one should seek to master.

I admit it, my writing skills were pretty poor when I first joined CWC. I was well aware of this and challenged myself to become more involved in an activity I didn’t particularly take up on my own. On top of all the books I was reading, I figured some writing for fun would help me out. Although I was driven to challenge myself, I didn’t quite realize that my decisions to become more literate would eventually benefit me in the long run.

As many of you reading this may relate, our generation has become lazier when it comes to improving a skill we aren’t too keen on. This could be art, a particular sport, or playing an instrument, for example. However, I believe writing isn’t something we should just ignore as one of our lacking strengths. If you want to impress people (employers, coworkers, friends), then having a strong friend in writing will be extremely beneficial.

If we’re talking specific examples of why writing is meaningful, then a few would be:

  • Communication. If you’re trying to get a point across but don’t know how to word your letter correctly, that could backfire when you really can’t afford it to.
  • Monetary value. If you can write well, many doors open up to you in terms of making some extra money (or even a career). Software writers, creative writers/novelists, and bloggers put their literacy skills to good use in ways they can even be paid for it.
  • An engaging writer grabs your attention. For example, if you have to make a presentation for work and need to make an impression, possessing strong writing competence would certainly upgrade the quality of your work.
  • Speak better. By having a superior knowledge in writing, your vocabulary would have improved as a side effect (a good one!) You’ll be able to get ideas and thoughts across more easily, give and present feedback in more effective ways and get your thoughts out more clearly when you need to most.
  • It can be a hobby. Everyone needs one or two things they do for fun in their spare time, and for a lot of people that’s creative writing. If you’re reading this, the odds are that you do take up creative writing for fun (woohoo!) and enjoy all the pleasures that come from forging new ideas into stories and other exciting forms of writing.

I feel as if I can’t emphasize the importance of literacy and writing enough, but I’m also aware that many, many people feel the same. On that note, keep challenging yourself and pushing to become an even better writer no matter what skill level you’re at. When you stop learning, you stop growing. Good luck, Scribblers!

“Life Advice” by Cristi

You will be rejected,
And it will be okay
You will lose friends,
And it will be okay
You will stop liking
Stuff
And it will be okay

Do not forget to
Try new foods
Do not forget to
Sleep every now
And then
Do not forget to
Thank people
When it is due
Do not forget to
Read a book

And, lastly,
Do not forget
That you love to write.

City of Stars by Alexia

A bright hazy gleam
Both solemn and giddy
Trapped inside a dazzling dream
Is this magnificent city

Air so crisp, fragile almost
Black expanses reaching past the sea
Certainly not a coast
In this stretching city

Bring your pain and sorrow
Come close as you are
For all will be gold by the ‘morrow
In this city without scars

So crowded it’s burning
Each one touches the next
Each heart filled with yearning
Inside this city’s chest

Busy as can be when things streak by
Leaving trails of sparkling dust
Painted across the night sky
In city-like gusts

This shining city is not from near
This city lies very far.
No where near here
Is this city of stars

“Disguised Ignorance” by Mary-Kelly

Don’t let disguised ignorance change who you are
Really, honestly, you’ve made it this far
Your heart is pure, you don’t need this scar
Don’t lose that soul that shines like a star,
Don’t let them change who you were meant to be
They’re after your innocence, can’t you see?
It’s o’ so clear, or is it just me?
That they really mean them when they say “we,”
Believe me when I say that you’re better than them
You’re like a walking miracle but times ten
Don’t listen to the person they wish to condemn
They want to tear you apart and rip away your stem,
Several years down the line, you’ll see their true form
They’ll try to convince you that you’re far from the norm
Please don’t be fooled by the temptations of their storm
They will try to fool you by using lies to inform,
So please, I beg you
None of this is new
People like you are few
You’re everything times two

Chapter Two by Rosalind

It would be cliché to spend an entire work of writing referring to life as a story, however because of the truth to this clique, it would be frankly inappropriate to dedicate this piece to anything other than such. Life is in fact a story. It is a book in our lap as we sit on a Spring day combing through page after page eager to get to the next thing that we can never see coming. Like a good book of writing, life carries a future that is unexpected, a past we sometimes ache over and other times smile at the memories of, and a unique and complex structure that holds our attention and urges us on. Like good characters life introduces us to relatable and lovable strangers that become branded on our hearts, to evil and pained creatures that scar our souls, to passing glances and smiles on street corners.

Life inspires books and stories, that is where authors got the idea in the first place. Fiction is simply reflections and parodies of real life and things we sometimes wish were possible, or would like to see change. Fiction is life through another dimension, but let’s pay attention to the real life stories for a moment shall we?

I’ve been a CWC member for all my years of high school, even some before, and this essay that I write for you my fellow club goers will be my last. As I prepare my departure from the CWC, FLVS as a whole as well, and move onto my college journey that will shape the remainder of my life, I say goodbye to Chapter One of my existence. I say goodbye to the events that have occurred in my short eighteen years of living, and I turn the page to Chapter Two. A chapter that is sure to be full of it’s decent share of adventures and great achievements, as I also expect it to carry it’s equal if not heavier burden of challenges and battles to be won.

In no way am I long lived, nor as wise as my mother or her mother before her. By not a single chance do I bare the adult experience of those that have walked this earth as beings for decades in time, however I do bare preparation and expectance. Not to say I know what’s coming, only to assert I am set. As I ready for words on fresh pages, I harden my skin and armor my soul for the future. Dawning my horse, pointing my sword straight ahead into my fight. I have fought, and though I am young, Chapter One has been full of long lakes to jump, oceans to swim across. I’ve completed one of the four seas. Three left, and I will have lived.

I consider my activism to be just learning to walk. I see my strength as only beginning to speak it’s first words. My skills are merely about to be born. Chapter Two is frightening, but to not apply all it’s labels would be sin. Chapter Two is also exciting. Chapter Two is rousing, Chapter Two is challenging, Chapter Two is standing in my face with war paint streaked beneath her fiery eyes. I must only need to apply mine to be officially part of this quest.

Chapter Two is not the biggest challenge, but it is the next step, and the next step always seems so much larger than truth. You yourself may be turning the pages, and seeing you’re nearing the next part of your story, but perhaps you don’t know what it is you’re about to start reading. Truthfully, no one knows. I believe not even the highest of power’s could have a clue, and the reason for this is because you’re the author yourself. You have turned to blank pages, that at first may imply your life has come to an end. But in reality, you have been writing Chapter One since you left the womb. The moment your breath found you in this world, your first cries dripped beginning speckles of ink to your story and the words poured from you in waterfalls. You wrote this so far, you beautiful writer you, and now you have reached a point where you’re beginning to realize just how involved you have been. Your reason is THE reason that life has happened in the way it has, that you have made it this far. Through strength and wit and bravery you persisted, and now it is time to continue to rise.

Your heart is your blank page, your soul is your pen, your intentions are your ideas, so write, write, write my friend.

Chapter Two has come at last, and perhaps sooner than any of us could ever think. So now move forward passionately. Embrace all that comes with it, fear or pain or happiness or all. This is Chapter Two, this is the second ocean. It is time to swim. It is time.

“Just like moons and like suns, With the certainty of tides, Just like hopes springing high, Still I’ll rise.” – Maya Angelou

YOU will rise…

Poem by Celeste

I remember your fingernails,
Gripping onto the flaky yellow paint,
Rusty chips drifting slowly,
Through infinity and between dewy grass blades.

Your heart beat like a stopwatch,
On a lonely daylight saving’s night,
Lights flashing in lost daydream,
Through the residue of a lone raindrop.

Your irises gleam like cold lemonade in the sunshine,
Twisting a red-stained popsicle stick between your lips,
Making me pray I could keep ice from melting away,
And film a moment in my eyes.

The Close of a Chapter: Plugging into the Virtual Community by Olivia

As I near the end of my high school career, I can’t help but think about all of the wonderful memories and lifelong friends that I have made through FLVS. As a writer, I have been able to thrive in clubs like Creative Writing Club, News in a Click and NEHS. I have participated in Poetry Read-Ins, Shakespeare Festivals and Celebrate Literacy Month. I have also had the invaluable opportunity to collaborate with immensely talented writers and highlight student work through Open Mics. These experiences have greatly enriched my writing and provided inspiration that I will carry with me when I go to college.

In my final blog post, I wanted to remind you of the power of plugging into our virtual community. By getting involved in FLVS clubs and activities, you are introduced to a world of inspiration. In our student-led newspaper, News in a Click, we spend weekly meetings collaborating and brainstorming articles. At National English Honor Society meetings, we host discussions about the power of literacy and highlight student pieces and book recommendations through monthly events. In Creative Writing Club, you have the wonderful opportunity to connect with other student writers and read student work, while receiving feedback and edits on your own pieces. Through FLVS, I have met some of the most talented writers that I have ever known, but more than that, friends that I will keep for life.

Participating in clubs like these is a great way to combat writer’s block and get inspiration, feedback and encouragement from other students. It is also an opportunity to make new friends and step outside of your comfort zone. Writing exercises and prompts provided by Creative Writing Club are great resources to remain inspired and NEHS-sponsored tutoring is an awesome way to share your love of reading and writing with younger students. Writing articles for News in a Click is helpful practice for academic writing. These clubs are also great ways to get honest and constructive feedback on your writing. In our monthly Open Mics at National English Honor Society meetings, I am always incredibly inspired by the amount of positive feedback that our members provide writers and oftentimes this encouragement is what causes writers to continue submitting pieces. Over the past two years, I have had the priceless opportunity to watch writers grow and learn from the feedback and encouragement of fellow club members.

At the close of my senior year, I can say that my time with Florida Virtual clubs has truly made my high school experience. The inspiration, encouragement and collaboration that comes from working with other students that are similarly passionate about literacy is something that I will truly miss. I deeply encourage all of you to get plugged in to the FLVS community through clubs that align with your interests, as my experiences as a member of these clubs has greatly contributed to my growth as a writer, a learner, a student and a human being. Has an FLVS club influenced your writing? Let me know in the comments below!